An analysis of the concept of puritanism in the 17th century and the first great awakening

Bring fact-checked results to the top of your browser search. The 18th century In America in the early years of the 18th century, some writers, such as Cotton Mathercarried on the older traditions. His huge history and biography of Puritan New EnglandMagnalia Christi Americana, inand his vigorous Manuductio ad Ministerium, or introduction to the ministry, inwere defenses of ancient Puritan convictions. He supported his claims by relating them to a complex metaphysical system and by reasoning brilliantly in clear and often beautiful prose.

An analysis of the concept of puritanism in the 17th century and the first great awakening

Roots of Revolution The major effect of the Awakening was a rebellion against authoritarian religious rule which spilled over into other areas of colonial life. Amidst the growing population of the colonies within the 18th Century and mass public gatherings, charismatic personalities such as Whitefield and Tennent rolled through to deliver their messages.

Though a religious movement, the Awakening had repercussions in cultural and political spheres as well.

What caused the Great Awakening?

Customs of civility and courtesy, the governing norms of life in the colonies, were set aside in favor of a more quarrelsome age. Practices and mind-sets were changed by the Awakening like never before. Towards an American Identity Revivalism in the colonies did not form around a complex theology of religious freedom, but nevertheless the ideas it produced opposed the notion of a single truth or a single church.

As preachers visited town after town, sects began to break off larger churches and a multitude of Protestant denominations sprouted. The older groups that dominated the early colonies — the Puritans and the Anglicans — eventually began a drastic downward trend in popularity.

The effect of Great Awakening unity was an attitude that went against the deferential thinking that consumed English politics and religion.

The chain of authority no longer ran from God to ruler to people, but from God to people to ruler. The children of revivalism later echoed this radicalism and popular self-righteousness in the American Revolution, when self-assertion turned against the tyrannical ways of George III.

Government as Contract Another effect of the Great Awakening on colonial culture was the growth of the notion of state rule as a contract with the people. Parishioners during the revival gained an understanding of covenants with their churches as contractual schemes; they argued that each believer owed the church their obedience, and the churches in turn owed their congregants the duty to be faithful to the Gospel.

Parishioners therefore reserved the right to dissolve the covenant and to sever ties with the church without prior permission. This notion of covenant was a popular one in Puritan society and reflected a common biblical understanding of association. Present in the Mayflower Compact and later forming an ideological basis for breaking from Great Britain, the notion of covenant grew to link religion and politics in the colonies.

With the frequency by which believers broke away from larger churches to form splinter groups, the colonists must have been accustomed to separating themselves from larger institutions. Religious Uniformity Perhaps the greatest fuel added to the revolutionary fire that began burning in the latter half of the 18th Century was religious pluralism within the colonies.

Unlike England, which after the Glorious Revolution of had become spiritually stagnant under the Church of England, the colonists adhered to no single denomination.

The splits in churches that revivalism had caused prevented uniformity in religion from becoming a reality.

The new nation

While groups such as the Quakers and Anglicans still existed in areas, none could rise to dominate the religious scene and become the primary American religion. So long as the colonists did not become complacent, their religious zeal would continue to burn strong.Puritanism and The Great Awakening greatly impacted the American Society during the 17th and 18th century.

The Puritan Church basically ran the newly formed government. Puritanism during the seventeenth century had many effects on the American Society. /5(4). Analysis and Information covering the First Great Awakening 04 Significance of the Great Awakening: Roots of Revolution The major effect of the Awakening was a rebellion against authoritarian religious rule which spilled over into other areas of colonial life.

Puritanism & Predestination. The First Great Awakening. Religious Pluralism in the Middle Colonies. Church and State in British North America.

The Separation of Church and State from the American Revolution to the Early Republic. The Church of England in Early America. a Puritan minister in 17th-century Massachusetts, was known as the.

An analysis of the concept of puritanism in the 17th century and the first great awakening

The First Great Awakening was a time period characterized by an emphasis on religion among Protestants in the s and s (Heyrman). It resulted from powerful preaching that deeply affected listeners with deep emotions and convictions.

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Analysis and Information covering the First Great Awakening.

The Influence of Religion in America Essay – Free Papers and Essays Examples

What caused the Great Awakening? In late 17th Century England, fighting between religious and political groups came to a halt with the Glorious Revolution of , an event which established the Church of England as the reigning church of the country. Judaism, and Puritanism.

Jonathan Edwards | American theologian | vetconnexx.com